European Bee Eater

Seeing Rainbows

I had to do a double-take when I first saw images of the European Bee Eater. We have nothing close to this in my hometown, so I was pinching myself that such beautiful birds existed! Armed with a new pack of coloured pencils and a hopeful heart, I reached out to a very talented photographer and now friend, Robert Kreinz from Austria. I was elated when he gave me his blessing to draw his bird!

What attracted me to this particular image was how Robert captured the bird poised so elegantly. His rainbow feathers blending and flowing into each other, seamlessly yet distinctly. I loved the richness and simplicity.

About Bee Eaters

There are 25 species of bee eaters and they mostly reside in tropical and subtropical Eurasia, Africa, and Australasia. Their diet consists of mostly bees, wasps, hornets, and other insects by catching them mid-flight. As for the stingers, the bee eaters will repeatedly hit the insect on a hard surface until it is removed. Bee eaters are currently classified as “least concern” in terms of threat level by Bird Life International.

This wonderful news lead me to question: What would happen if society continued to use neonectides and other harmful pesticides? Spraying it so freely? At what point would we impact their food chain to the point of bee eaters becoming classified as “threatened”? Pardon the pun, but it is “food for thought”…

About Robert Kreinz

With an interest in nature since childhood, Robert has found his ability to connect and express through photography. At the young age of 18, he had begun photographing and developing his images. In 2004, Robert decided to pursue photography further while focusing on nature. Today he is a member of the RAW Community of creative people and has an impressive gallery of images which includes birds, mammals, landscape, and macro photography. Please visit his website www.robertkreinz.com or follow him on Instagram @rkreinz. If you fall in love with any of his images, they are available for purchase by contacting him directly.


Materials used: Faber-Castell Polychromos in Canson ArtBook

This image is not for sale. Please contact me for commissions if you are interested, or please visit my wildlife gallery. Thank you!

This image is not for sale. Please contact me for commissions if you are interested, or please visit my wildlife gallery. Thank you!

Mel Unger