Northern Emerald Toucanet

“Tim” the Emerald Toucanet

If you’ve read my story on “Howard” the Hyacinth Macaw, this is his wall-buddy. I ordered a matching frame for Howard and knew Tim would be his loyal side-kick as soon as I saw Jose’s reference photo. So instead of wedding photos in our room, I’ve convinced my husband to hang up two birds!

Why I chose this image. The composition Jose has captured could not have been more perfect! I love how Tim and Howard are facing each other and I can imagine them sharing stories over a bowl of fruit, nuts, and lizards. I was also really attracted to how Jose captured the variety and depth of greens and his curiously bright eye. I felt Tim’s posture was of an innocent child, full of hope and daydream looking up into the sky.

To find out how my illustration got nicknamed “Banana Tim”, please scroll to the bottom photo.

About Emerald Toucanets

There are several subspecies of Emerald Toucanets, mostly showing images of white, blue, or black throats. The image I drew from was more violet-throated. Although I have found some references to a “violet-throated group”, I would need a bird expert to help me with ID’ing the difference.

Emerald Toucanets are small and sweet, about one foot long from head to tail and have a lifespan of about 20 years. They live in humid, open woodland, higher elevations ranging from parts of Mexico through Central America and into parts of South America. Their diet consists of fruit, berries, nuts, seeds, bird eggs, and small invertebrates such as lizards and nestlings. During mating season, their fun courtship involves feeding each other. For nesting, they seek out hollowed trees or abandoned woodpecker nests because their beaks are not designed for heavy excavation work.

According to Bird Life International Data Zone, Emerald Toucanets currently have a large population geographically spread over an expansive range. Although their population is in decline, they are listed under “least concern”. Hopefully with ongoing wildlife conservation awareness and efforts, their population remains stable well into the future.

About Jose Antonio Fernandez Carrasco

Jose’s passion for wildlife and photography came before his interest in birds. At the age of nine, he was attracted to amphibians and reptiles the way little boys are and his mother would have to search his pockets for snakes, frogs, or lizards. At fifteen years old, he bought his first camera and went out photographing amphibians and reptiles, which likely made his mother happier! A few years later, Jose invested in his first digital camera and began capturing birds. He met some avid bird-lovers who spread the affection to him and suddenly it became his passion. Jose enjoys a simple life in Spain and believes that living passionately is the seed to happiness. His life dream is to spend all of his days getting lost in time and space photographing wildlife in the countryside. You can find his beautiful gallery on Instagram @joseantoniofernandezcarrasco76.


Materials used: Faber-Castell Polychromos and Pitt Artist Pen (White 1.5) on Strathmore Bristol Vellum 100lb paper (11x14 inches)


This image is not for sale. Please contact me for commissions if you are interested, or please visit my Gallery. Thank you!

This image is not for sale. Please contact me for commissions if you are interested, or please visit my Gallery. Thank you!


And this was how he got his online nickname “Banana Tim”. I needed some visual assistance and coincidentally had the perfect banana in my kitchen. No bananas were injured in the making of this image, although it did become my afternoon snack =)

And this was how he got his online nickname “Banana Tim”. I needed some visual assistance and coincidentally had the perfect banana in my kitchen. No bananas were injured in the making of this image, although it did become my afternoon snack =)

Mel Unger